Homeless Children: The Other One Percent

Drinking a cup of coffee this afternoon, fighting off unprecedented, increasing allergy assaults this spring (I live in a wonderfully flowering parkland with a yard in full bloom), I leisurely read this Sunday’s headlines: Joining Washington’s one percenters takes more than the U.S. average .  According to writers Gowen, Morello, and Mellnik, a household income must be far above the national average of $387,000, to be in the area’s top 1 percent. The gateway for the region is $527,000. And the numbers in this category are increasing.  Frankly, this may well be considered a good thing.  Certainly, this is a sign that the economy is not absolutely flat, and that there is an expanding opportunity for charitable contributions in the region. But where are the headlines about the other one percent, the bottom, which includes those nearly 500 homeless District children who live in an aging hospital turned emergency shelter, in the midst of this affluence? How many of the affluent have ever met a child who lives in the large emergency family shelter located at the former D.C. General Hospital? These numbers are increasing, too. These children are housed with their indigent parents in eyesight of the city morgue and jail. Death and incarceration. Disparities and dispair. No place for growing children. Yet these formidable facilities are much more appealing than the family shelter itself. I think it is simply wrong for us to allow such subliminal messaging to poor children. This breeds hopelessness, disconnect, anger, and a culture of poverty. If you are interested in joining with others to make a difference, let me know.

Sharing Is Caring

Author

Name: Dr. Sheryl Brissett Chapman

About: Dr. Sheryl Brissett Chapman, Ed.D., ACSW, Executive Director, provides agency administrative oversight, consultative support for all programs, and ensures overall contract and program compliance. Dr. Chapman has more than 40 years of experience supervising national, state and local human services programs, and is an expert on child and family welfare and child protection.

ABOUT US

blog-sidebar-aboutUs-logo

Founded in 1915 as an orphanage in the District of Columbia, NCCF is a private, nonprofit child and family welfare agency with a commitment to serving poor, disadvantaged, abused, neglected and/or abandoned children, youth, and their families.

Current program services include emergency shelters and transitional housing for homeless families, a high-intensity therapeutic group home, therapeutic and traditional foster care and adoption, independent living for youth transitioning to adulthood, teen parent services, and community-based prevention services that promote academic achievement, parental involvement, economic and vocational stability, and healthy families. Our programs have become social service models, redefining both NCCF’s reputation and the agency’s position in the human service continuum in the Washington Metropolitan Region.

blog-sidebar-aboutUs-logo

Founded in 1915 as an orphanage in the District of Columbia, NCCF is a private, nonprofit child and family welfare agency with a commitment to serving poor, disadvantaged, abused, neglected and/or abandoned children, youth, and their families.

Current program services include emergency shelters and transitional housing for homeless families, a high-intensity therapeutic group home, therapeutic and traditional foster care and adoption, independent living for youth transitioning to adulthood, teen parent services, and community-based prevention services that promote academic achievement, parental involvement, economic and vocational stability, and healthy families. Our programs have become social service models, redefining both NCCF’s reputation and the agency’s position in the human service continuum in the Washington Metropolitan Region.

Subscribe To Our Newsletter


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: The National Center for Children and Families, 6301 Greentree Road, Bethesda, MD, 20817, http://www.nccf-cares.org. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
Join our newsletter to stay up to date on features and releases